Lovereading.co.uk

Search
Categories
Pages
Recent Posts
Archives

Top 10 most popular books on Lovereading 15 – 22 January 2017

Lovereading.co.uk Top 10

1
The Bone Field The Bone Field
Simon Kernick
January 2017 Book of the Month.
A series? By Simon Kernick? Yes please! Two faces, who were unknown to each other in previous books, join forces in this powerful, fast moving and intoxicating tale. Trouble starts to hunt Ray Mason down …
Download free opening extract
2
The Chilbury Ladies' Choir The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir
Jennifer Ryan
An engaging and charmingly bittersweet slice of fiction set during the Second World War. In a Kent village during 1940, the vicar closes the choir, as the ladies of the village start their own choir, the small rebellion creates a …
Download free opening extract
3
The Trouble with Goats and Sheep The Trouble with Goats and Sheep
Joanna Cannon
January 2017 Debut of the Month.
One of our Books of the Year 2016.
The title refers to a Bible quote and two 10-year old girls are greatly mystified as to its meaning and where to find God. They spend the hot …
Download free opening extract
4
My Sweet Revenge My Sweet Revenge
Jane Fallon
Sharp, funny and clever, this unpredictable novel tells a bitter-sweet tale of high passions, infidelity and revenge.  It is Jane Fallon at her best. When Paula discovers her actor husband is having an affair, she is determined to make him fall …
Download free opening extract
5
The Secret Lives of the Amir Sisters The Secret Lives of the Amir Sisters
Nadiya Hussain
January 2017 Debut of the Month.
A lovely warm and joyful squeeze of a read. When a family bombshell hits, four sisters each tell their own story. We get to know Fatima, Farah, Bubblee and Mae, and because their lives revolve …
Download free opening extract
6
The Veil (Testaments I and II) The Veil (Testaments I and II)
Joseph D’Lacey
January 2017 Book of the Month.
A provocative, gut-wrenching and oh so readable pair of tales. Two novellas, testaments I and II, are included in this book of ‘The Veil’, both very different stories, yet linked to ‘the long silence’ that …
Download free opening extract
7
The Affair The Affair
Amanda Brooke
A family drama full of suspense, tension and heartache. Nina’s 15 year old daughter Scarlett is pregnant, and the father is a married man. As the main story moves from before to after the revelation, Scarlett also tells her story, …
Download free opening extract
8
Behind Her Eyes Behind Her Eyes
Sarah Pinborough
Oh my word, this book is devious, twisted, and an absolute knockout! The story, revolving around love, passion, suspicion, and deceit kept me teetering on a razor sharp wire of uncertainty. Sarah Pinborough’s writing is sublime, it’s shrewd, artful, cunning, …
Download free opening extract
9
The Essex Serpent The Essex Serpent
Sarah Perry
One of our Books of the Year 2016.
Shortlisted for the Costa Novel Award 2016.
A gorgeously eloquent and powerfully expressive novel, ‘The Essex Serpent’ explores an unusual relationship in the 1890’s. This isn’t exactly a love story, it is rather, a …
Download free opening extract
10
The One Memory of Flora Banks The One Memory of Flora Banks
Emily Barr
January 2017 NewGen MEGA Debut of the Month.
In a nutshell: the unforgettable story of a girl with no memory.
Can there ever have been a heroine like Flora Banks? She’s 17 when the book opens, but an accident aged 10 has …
Download free opening extract

 

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
Share

Mid January eNewsletter

Mid-January and we hope your New Year’s resolutions are going well, especially any to do with reading more. Read on for many more recommendations. 

And with Valentine’s Day peeking over the horizon we are enjoying Love Makes the World Stand Still by Cath Tate. A devastatingly funny book that is bursting with romantic sentiment, insightful wisdom and a tiny touch of cynicism.

Unmissable January Highlights

Here, all in one place, are the highlights of this month’s top recommendations. Books you won’t want to miss. Books like:

The Bone Field by Simon Kernick – A January Book of the Month: ‘A fast-paced thriller which I would heartily recommend.’ (Rachael Anderson, Reader Reviewer). Everything You Told Me by Lucy Dawson – Fast-paced, intense and gripping psychological thriller. The Affair by Amanda Brooke – ‘Unpredictable and compelling‘ (Reader Review). A stand-out family drama and a captivating and thought-provoking read.
A Family Secret by Josephine Cox – Master storytelling: the secrets and love at the heart of family life and how truth can disrupt. My Sweet Revenge by Jane Fallon – A bittersweet tale of high passions, infidelity and revenge. Watch your back…
fd rt

Let us help you make 2017 the year to get more creative

OK, by now a lot of the New Year’s resolutions you made may well have fallen by the wayside so why not make some more. What about a creative hobby? If so, take a look at our Arts and Crafts category. A real favourite in the office and new this month is The Great Pottery Throw Down by Liz Wilhide and Susie Hodge, a complement to the TV series and a celebration of the unpredictability, history, usefulness, and the tactile and visual beauty of pottery.

Recommended by our Reader Reviewers

Did you know we have a dedicated group of fervent readers and reviewers across the country who give us their honest opinion and experience of current books? Not only can you use their reviews to help you choose your next read, but they have proven so popular that we have decided to share their feedback with you on the titles they are really raving about. We hope you enjoy.

Miss Treadway & the Field of Stars by Miranda Emmerson – ‘an engrossing … story’; ‘a super read’; ‘fabulously immersive’; ‘should be on everyone’s reading list‘ (Reader Review). Good Me, Bad Me by Ali Land – The author doesn’t hold back in this uncomfortable, powerful, provocative read – it’s an absolute knockout. Welcome to Nowhere by Elizabeth Laird – The lives of a Syrian refugee family are brought vividly and sympathetically to life for young readers but we believe it is a must read for everyone.

Don’t miss 2016’s Must-Reads.

2016 as well as being a year of turbulent change was also a bumper year for brilliance on the bookshelf. We have compiled our favourites in one easy to browse category so that you won’t miss out on the literary gold-dust of 2016. Enjoy!

Fabulous February titles you can start reading now

The only thing better than getting a great new book as soon as it’s published is sneaking a peak before it hits the shelves. This is where you can!

The Moment She Left – A completely captivating and tension-filled dramatic tale. Emotional and yet terrifically readable. You Said Forever – Tugs at your heartstrings, pushes you to face your disbelief, and yet is filled with warmth and hope too. Who’s That Girl by Mhairi McFarlane – A funny, sad, entertaining and really enjoyable read – another winner from this fabulous author.’ Caroline Mathews
ghfcmtlc

Books to give you a fresh start in 2017

Browse our New Year, New You category to get some help and support with your New Year’s Resolutions to make positive change in your life. And don’t miss:

Clean and Lean for Life from wellness guru James Duigan where he brings his clean and lean philosophy to a cookbook with 150 recipes that refreshes your whole approach to food whilst providing the advice you need to live a cleaner, healthier existence.

From TV to the written word

Frank Gardner is the BBC’s Security Correspondent and he has used his in-depth knowledge and experience to craft a nerve-shreddingly plausible international thriller called Crisis. Ex-Special Boat Service commando turned MI6 operative Luke Carlton fights to save his country from catastrophic attack. This is terrifying, edge-of-your-seat stuff and we loved it!

A Debut you shouldn’t miss and you won’t forget

It’s very hard to write a book that has real appeal to teens and adults but when it works it is sublimely brilliant and we think we have found one in The One Memory of Flora Banks by Emily Barr.

An accident aged ten has left Flora with no short term memory. Then a secret kiss on the beach – with her only friend’s boyfriend – lodges in her mind. Inspired, she sets off alone to follow him. It’s a unique mix, part coming-of-age, and part psychological thriller, with an almost fairy-tale setting that we think will be one of the books of 2017.

Have you discovered Ragnar Jonasson yet?

Combining Golden Age crime writing and Nordic Noir there is, quite simply, nothing like them and if you have yet to read him, you are missing a treat. The 4th in his Dark Iceland series, Rupture, has just been published. Set in a small fishing village in Northern Iceland accessible only by a tunnel this is first class classic detection with a frozen twist. See the shelf below and enjoy.

cwh

And that’s all from us this month. Happy New Year and best wishes for a prosperous, page-turning 2017!

P.S. We loved Apple Tree Yard by Louise Doughty when it was published in 2013 and were very excited to hear it has been made into a TV series. So, from 22 January, we will be turning off the phone on Sunday nights at 9pm to make sure we don’t miss a second. We recommend you do the same.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
Share

EMERGING WRITER AWARD 2017

The Emerging Writer Award – Submissions open 23rd January
Deadline: Monday 25th February, 5pm

 
Established in 2015, the Emerging Writer Award (formerly the Bridge Award) is now in its third year, and is run by Moniack Mhor in partnership with The Bridge Awards, a philanthropic venture that has helped to fund theatre and visual arts projects.

 
The award winner receives a tailor-made package worth up to £2,000 including tuition via open courses, retreat time and/or mentoring.
You can read about the previous winners HERE.

 
Moniack Mhor and The Bridge Awards are pleased to announce the opening of applications for the 2017 Emerging Writer Award, (previously The Bridge Award). The award is for unpublished prose fiction writers wishing to make a significant breakthrough in developing a full-length piece of work.

 
Tracey Emerson, from The Bridge Awards, says: “We hope that the combination of Moniack Mhor’s beautiful setting, inspiring courses and experienced mentors will enhance the awardee’s creative practice and provide a valuable stepping-stone in his/her writing career.”

 
The successful candidate will receive a tailor-made package worth up to £2,000 including tuition via open courses, retreat time and/or mentoring. Click here to find out how to enter

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
Share

Lovereading Review. Under The Ivy by Marcia Lake

Under The Ivy is a unique collection of short stories and essays, all of which contain an inspirational spiritual element or undertone.

 

Bound together by a sense of positivity and grace, they are uplifting and bring a real sense of comfort to readers.

 

Easy to dip into, the book covers a broad array of subjects, from a girl with acne who is desperate to have clear skin, to an elderly lady with dementia trying to understand her path in life.

 

Although varied, the major theme that runs throughout each story is the sense of “overcoming” some great hurdle. It may be a sense of loss or grief, unrequited love or isolation from being different that presents the crisis, but help is found from the spiritual realm.

 

This metaphysical aid comes in many symbolic forms, such as guardian angels, saints or the kindly apparitions of those who have long since passed over, but each is a manifestation of, and connection to, a deeper reality than the protagonist was previously aware of.

 

In one story, for instance, a young girl is guided by angles during a serious operation, while another contemplating suicide is jolted away from her dark thoughts by the appearance of a rainbow.

 

Author Marcia Lake is a rising name in the sphere of mind, body and spirit (MBS) literature and her writing reflects her own beliefs and life experiences.

 

Having found great support in this world-view, her aim is to help awaken readers to their spiritual side and to show through her writing that there is a greater good at work in the universe that helps lost souls “learn their lessons in life”.

 

Her message is simple: that spiritual forces, including animals in some cases, can do much to protect us from harm and help us understand our spiritual pathways.

 

The MBS genre isn’t for everyone, and whether you subscribe to the author’s spiritual convictions or not is entirely a personal matter, but Marcia never oversteps the mark or risks harming the poignancy of each story or essay by coming across as preachy.

 

Indeed, she weaves her underlying beliefs subtlety into the narrative arcs so that they work towards the literary effect rather than intruding.

 

Each piece of writing is self-contained and exudes a sense of the poetic, with a fairytale and dream-like quality to them.

 

Though Marcia deals with traumas, her writing is designed to heal wounds rather than cause them, and build that essential feeling of hope even in the darkest hours.

 

In fact, the stories are often very funny and despite having a spiritual undertone are heavily set in realism and the relatable.

 

For instance, they’ll often be about common modern worries, such as having bad skin, finding a good job or yearning to find that special soul mate.

 

Teenage girls and young women may particularly connect to these tales, as will fans of the MBS genre, but the book is meant for anyone who has encountered difficulties and is looking for something beyond themselves to help fill a spiritual gap.

 

This is Marcia’s second book, and follows 2013’s Grace, a deeply personal and autobiographical account of her battle with, and eventual victory over, mental illness. Upon release, Grace was praised for breaking down barriers regards mental health issues and its inspirational message, and should be considered a companion piece to those who enjoy Under The Ivy.

 

Under the Ivy by Marcia Lake (Hope Books) is out now in paperback, priced at £5.99. Visit marcialake.com

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
Share

Author Talk: Five minutes with Katie Fforde

Writing at home is never easy but Katie has found the perfect balance. The President of Romantic Novelists’ Association (RNA) talks to Mary Hogarth about her latest books, characters and setting up a bursary for new writers.

 

The inspiration for A Secret Garden came from?

Our open gardens, a group of us (all gardeners) have been opening our gardens for about four years and we have sculptures too. It’s much nicer if there is something else to look at besides plants.

The book had several sources of inspiration, one being when I was invited to meet the Master Mason at Gloucester Cathedral. He was a Frenchman on whom I based Jack’s character, although I made Jack a bit different and English.

Once I had the garden, I added a secret part and various elements. I also wanted to have an unlikely romance, so in came the lovely Irish car mechanic and a snooty lady to shake people up a bit.

 

How did you develop such complex characters?

I think myself into their heads, imagining where they come from and how the world appears to them. For example if you’ve come from Ireland, you might have escaped from an oppressive, but kindly family.

Of course I also need to understand a character’s foundation such as a past romantic life if they’ve had one, are they the youngest or eldest child of the family and do they have children?

 

Is researching your character’s trades difficult?

I find someone who has a particular job I want to include then talk to them about it. For A Secret Garden, my lovely gardener tracked down some wonderful nursery people to help me understand what their job involves.

Having a conversation is far better than researching a role online, that’s why I always like to talk to people if I can, especially if they are enthusiastic about their work. For me the hardest part is making an approach. Sometimes I’m reluctant as I’m a bit shy about approaching people, but when I do people are mostly delighted.

 

Your favourite time and place to write?

I like to write early in the morning before breakfast. I try to shut myself in my office, but actually I work better when away from home so I go on writing retreats mostly with friends. Although we work hard we enjoy each other’s company and a glass or two of wine.

There is also this element of competition between us that make one work harder.

Being away from all the usual distractions such as household chores and interruptions I do far more than I would at home. I turn up at breakfast having written 1,000 words, then when the group goes off to write for the rest of the morning, I do too, so those 1,000 words then becomes 2,000.

 

The hardest novel to write?

Highland Fling as it was the first time I set a book outside my local Cotswold area. Because, although I had been to Scotland every year since I got married, I didn’t know it that well.

I had a great deal more knowledge when writing A Summer At Sea, which was set on board a Puffer boat in the Western Isles of Scotland. I already knew a lot about the Puffer and the area was a familiar environment.

 

How did you get your first book published?

I was very lucky being a member of RNA. They have a scheme whereby members can send in their unpublished novel for critical feedback.

That year the organizer was a literary scout and she sent my unpublished novel, Living Dangerously, to literary agent. The agent liked it enough to meet me and give me a few pointers. She then asked me to send her my first three chapters by end of the year. As new agent she was enthusiastic and cleverly managed to find a publisher before I finished it.

 

Describe your role as President of RNA

My son describes it as ‘ming vase’ role, but I like to take quite an active approach.

I’m not on the committee anymore but I do like to oversee and support the chair. Being chairperson is a bit of thankless task as it’s an awful lot of work, so it’s nice to have some one supporting you who knows what the role entails.

 

What motivated you to set up The Katie Fforde Bursary?

I had so much help from RNA when I was close to getting published but kept missing a book deal that I wanted to give something back.

The bursary, consisting of membership fee and a place at our three-day RNA Conference, was my opportunity to help struggling writers. I always choose someone who is struggling financially, juggling a day job with many other commitments just to be able to write.

This year I gave out two bursaries as there two, equally deserving applications. One of the joys of setting up your own bursary is that you have the final say and can award two if the situation arises.

 

Three characteristics of a successful novel?

  1. An original idea. It’s always best if you are the first person to write about cupcakes not the 59th.
  2. Create realistic characters that people are able to warm to ­– likeable heroine for instance should not be perfect.
  3. Have a hero who is truly gorgeous, but believable. The reader needs to be left with a sense of hope that perhaps one day she might meet someone is handsome, decent, but like all of us has his flaws.

 

Your next book is?

Set around farming. I got the idea from TV series about farming set in Scotland, taking part were a couple, who had had their farm for years, but to their great sorrow they didn’t have any children so couldn’t pass it on.

I thought what if I were a younger relative and given the opportunity to take on that farm? Then idea began to evolve into an elderly aunt who asks her niece to take over the struggling farm when she goes into a home to see if she can make it work.

For more details about Katie and her work visit www.katiefforde.com

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
Share

Top 10 most popular books on Lovereading 8 – 15 January 2017

Lovereading Top 10

1
The One Memory of Flora Banks The One Memory of Flora Banks
Emily Barr
January 2017 NewGen MEGA Debut of the Month.
In a nutshell: the unforgettable story of a girl with no memory.
Can there ever have been a heroine like Flora Banks? She’s 17 when the book opens, but an accident aged 10 has …
Download free opening extract
2
Behind Her Eyes Behind Her Eyes
Sarah Pinborough
Oh my word, this book is devious, twisted, and an absolute knockout! The story, revolving around love, passion, suspicion, and deceit kept me teetering on a razor sharp wire of uncertainty. Sarah Pinborough’s writing is sublime, it’s shrewd, artful, cunning, …
Download free opening extract
3
The Trouble with Goats and Sheep The Trouble with Goats and Sheep
Joanna Cannon
January 2017 Debut of the Month.
One of our Books of the Year 2016.
The title refers to a Bible quote and two 10-year old girls are greatly mystified as to its meaning and where to find God. They spend the hot …
Download free opening extract
4
The Secret Lives of the Amir Sisters The Secret Lives of the Amir Sisters
Nadiya Hussain
January 2017 Debut of the Month.
A lovely warm and joyful squeeze of a read. When a family bombshell hits, four sisters each tell their own story. We get to know Fatima, Farah, Bubblee and Mae, and because their lives revolve …
Download free opening extract
5
The Watcher The Watcher
Ross Armstrong
January 2017 Debut of the Month.
A clever first novel with a sinister setting in London where blocks of flats are being demolished. The juxtaposition of the bird watcher protagonist, Lily, and her people watching is a clever one as she …
Download free opening extract
6
Foxlowe Foxlowe
Eleanor Wasserberg
January 2017 Debut of the Month.
One of our Books of the Year 2016.
Green, her little sister Blue and October – known as Toby – are children growing up in Foxlowe, a huge old home on the moors. They run free, …
Download free opening extract
7
The Veil (Testaments I and II) The Veil (Testaments I and II)
Joseph D’Lacey
January 2017 Book of the Month.
A provocative, gut-wrenching and oh so readable pair of tales. Two novellas, testaments I and II, are included in this book of ‘The Veil’, both very different stories, yet linked to ‘the long silence’ that …
Download free opening extract
8
Katherine of Aragon, the True Queen Katherine of Aragon, the True Queen
Alison Weir
One of our Books of the Year 2016.
When you settle into an Alison Weir you settle into history itself. She is thorough, detailed and hugely knowledgeable. Here she delivers the first of a projected series to cover each of Henry …
Download free opening extract
9
Dodgers Dodgers
Bill Beverly
January 2017 Book of the Month.
One of our Books of the Year 2016.
Winner of the John Creasey (New Blood) and Goldsboro Gold Dagger Awards 2016.
Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer go rap! A striking literary thriller which follows the reluctant journey …
Download free opening extract
10
The Bone Field The Bone Field
Simon Kernick
January 2017 Book of the Month.
A series? By Simon Kernick? Yes please! Two faces, who were unknown to each other in previous books, join forces in this powerful, fast moving and intoxicating tale. Trouble starts to hunt Ray Mason down …
Download free opening extract
Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
Share

Stanfords Travel Writers Festival: Olympia 2 – 5 February 2017

Stanfords Travel Writers Festival Line-Up

From explorers, adventurers, TV presenters, journalists and politicians to food writers and poets, the Stanfords Travel Writers Festival will bring a brand new line-up of the very best travel authors to Destinations: The Holiday & Travel Show.

Authors will share accounts of their incredible adventures and expeditions, as well as offer expert tips for all those heading to these destinations. Beside the stage, you can browse through the Stanfords festival bookshop where you will be able to purchase copies of the authors’ books and have them personally signed and dedicated at the signings at Stanfords stand.

Find out more by clicking here.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
Share

Man Booker winners face off in Edward Stanford Travel Writing Awards Shortlists

Two literary giants find themselves in the running for the Fiction (with a sense of place) Book of the Year in shortlists for the Edward Stanford Travel Writing Awards announced today. The High Mountains of Portugal by Yann Martel, author of 2002 Man Booker winner Life of Pi, is joined on the shortlist by The Noise of Time by Julian Barnes, who claimed the same prize in 2011 for The Sense of an Ending. They are joined on the shortlist by novels by authors Jessie Burton, Eowyn Ivey, Robert Seethaler and Madeleine Thien, with locations including Alaska, Austria, China, Portugal, Spain and the former USSR.

Lyn Hughes, co-founder of Wanderlust magazine and chair of judges for the category, said: “Setting is a vital aspect of any novel; writers are granted all flights of fancy when it comes to character or plot, but if they are unable to transport the reader to their chosen locale, to bring the sights, sounds and smells of their characters’ surroundings to life, they will have failed. Our shortlisted writers have succeeded brilliantly, creating vividly portrayed backdrops around the world and across the centuries.”

Setting is also key, alongside blood, sweat and tears, in the shortlist for the Adventure Travel Book of the Year. Cycling exploits feature heavily: in Mark Beaumont’s Africa Solo, which tells of his record-breaking ride across Africa; Zimbabwean adventurer Sean Conway’s Cycling the Earth; and Dare to Do, Sarah Outen’s account of how she single-handedly circled the globe by bicycle, canoe and boat. Levison Wood and Dan Richards take us high into the mountains in Walking the Himalayas and Climbing Days respectively, while Crossing the Congo is an account of Mike Martin, Chloe Baker and Charlie Hatch-Barnwell’s epic 2,500-mile African journey. Phoebe Smith, Wanderlust editor and chair of judges for the category, said: “This shortlist is a tribute to the human spirit of endeavour and adventure, containing not just thrills and spills but inspiration on every page.”

Recipes from around the world, including Iran, Pakistan and Ibiza, feature in the Food and Travel Book of the Year shortlist, while folk tales, language and wildlife feature heavily in the Children’s Travel Book of the Year category. Islands and countries that no longer exist (if they ever did), maps from over 400 years past and photography from some of the world’s most stunning locations can be found on the shortlist for the Illustrated Travel Book of the Year. Finally, maps are at the core of the majority of the Innovation in Travel Publishing Award shortlist.

Tony Maher, Managing Director of Edward Stanford Limited, said: “As the world grows smaller and in many cases more dangerous, travel writing in all its forms keeps us in touch with our global family. These disparate shortlists have one unifying feature – they are all marvellous examples of what travel writing and publishing does best, which is to show the reader a world far from our own doorsteps, made reachable by these glorious, powerful and unforgettable books.”

The shortlists in full are as follows (alphabetically by author/creator):

Specsavers Fiction (with a sense of place)
• The Noise of Time by Julian Barnes (Jonathan Cape)
• The Muse by Jessie Burton (Picador)
• To the Bright Edge of the World by Eowyn Ivey (Tinder)
• The High Mountains of Portugal by Yann Martel (Canongate)
• The Tobacconist by Robert Seethaler, trans. by Charlotte Collins (Picador)
• Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien (Granta)

Wanderlust Adventure Travel Book of the Year
• Africa Solo by Mark Beaumont (Bantam Press)
• Cycling the Earth by Sean Conway (Ebury)
• Crossing the Congo: Over Land and Water in a Hard Place by Mike Martin, Chloe Baker and Charlie Hatch-Barnwell (C. Hurst & Co)
• Dare to Do: Taking on the Planet by Bike and Boat by Sarah Outen (Nicholas Brealey)
• Climbing Days by Dan Richards (Faber & Faber)
• Walking the Himalayas: An Adventure of Survival and Endurance by Levison Wood (Hodder & Stoughton)

National Book Tokens Children’s Travel Book of the Year
• Atlas of Oddities by Clive Gifford & Tracy Worrall (Red Shed)
• Atlas of Animal Adventures by Lucy Letherland, Rachel Williams and Emily Hawkins (Wide Eyed Editions)
• Hello World: A Celebration of Languages and Curiosities by Jonathan Litton and L’Atelier Cartographik (360 Degrees)
• A River by Marc Martin (Templar)
• A Year Full of Stories: 52 Folk Tales and Legends from Around the World by Angela McAllister and Christopher Corr (Frances Lincoln Children’s Books)
• A Walk on the Wild Side by Louis Thomas (Frances Lincoln Children’s Books)

Food and Travel magazine Food and Travel Book of the Year
• Persepolis: Vegetarian Recipes from Peckham, Persia and Beyond by Sally Butcher (Pavilion)
• The Saffron Tales: Recipes from the Persian Kitchen by Yasmin Khan (Bloomsbury)
• Provence to Pondicherry: Recipes from France and Faraway by Tessa Kiros (Quadrille)
• Eivissa: The Ibiza Cookbook by Anne Sijmonsbergen (HarperCollins)
• Rick Stein’s Long Weekends by Rick Stein (BBC Books)
• Summers Under the Tamarind Tree: Recipes and Memories from Pakistan by Sumayya Usmani (Frances Lincoln)

Destinations Show Illustrated Travel Book of the Year
• Explorer’s Sketchbooks: The Art of Discovery and Adventure by Huw Lewis-Jones and Kari Herbert (Thames and Hudson)
• The Travel Book: A Journey Through Every Country in the World (Lonely Planet)
• An Atlas of Countries That Don’t Exist by Nick Middleton (Macmillan)
• This Land: Landscape Wonders of Britain by Roly Smith and Joe Cornish (Frances Lincoln)
• Britain’s Tudor Maps: County by County by John Speed (Batsford)
• The Un-Discovered Islands: An Archipelago of Myths, Mysteries, Phantoms and Fates by Malachy Tallack and Katie Scott (Polygon)

London Book Fair Innovation in Travel Publishing
• Where the Animals Go: Tracking Wildlife with Technology in 50 Maps and Graphics by James Cheshire and Oliver Uberti (Particular Books)
• Citix60 series by Victionary (Gingko Press)
• Curiocity: In Pursuit of London by Henry Eliot and Matt Lloyd-Rose (Particular Books)
• Atlas Obscura by Joshua Foer, Dylan Thuras and Ella Morton (Workman)
• Blue Crow Media Maps (Blue Crow Media)
• Lonely Planet Best of series (Lonely Planet)

The awards will be judged by expert panels, there is also a public vote open now, which will be combined with the panel votes. All voters will be entered into a draw to win £100 of National Book Tokens.

The shortlist for the Stanford Dolman Travel Book of the Year, in association with the Authors’ Club, will be announced on 17th January at the Edward Stanford Travel Writing Awards launch party at the National Liberal Club. The winners of all categories, as well as the Lonely Planet Travel Blog of the Year and Bradt Travel Guides New Travel Writer of the Year, and the Edward Stanford Award for Outstanding Contribution to Travel Writing, will be revealed on 2nd February during the Stanfords Travel Writers Festival at Destinations: The Holiday and Travel Show at Olympia. The awards will be supported by a trade-wide travel books instore promotion at booksellers and libraries from 6th January until 24th February.

The Winner of the Stanford Dolman Travel Book of the year receives £5,000 and all winners receive an antique globe trophy, to be presented at the Awards ceremony.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
Share

January 2017 eNewsletter

Happy New Year! A page-turning 2017 awaits we can assure you. First though, you’re probably concerned with making, breaking or entirely forsaking your New Year’s Resolutions. Well, if you are wavering, or if you just fancy a fresh start after a pretty crazy 2016, why not take a leisurely stroll around our New Year, New You category and treat yourself well this January?

So Last Year! – Missed Must-Reads of 2016

2016 will be remembered for a lot of turbulent change in the political arena and the year that many heroes from the world of entertainment left the mortal coil. But it was also a bumper year for brilliance on the bookshelf. And so numerous that even the most dedicated readers among you may have missed a few! So, here is our very own expert-compiled retrospective of the literary gold-dust of 2016 to help you catch up. Enjoy!

First Footers! – Debuts of the Month

What better time to discover fabulous first-time writers than the first month of a brand new year? Don’t miss:

MEGA Debut… The One Memory of Flora Banks (YA) from Emily Barr, bestselling adult author but her first YA novel – A unique, unforgettable and wondrous tale. Part coming-of-age, part thriller and part fairytale. Brilliant!

Also, The Secret Lives of the Amir Sisters by Nadiya Hussain – Champions honesty, bravery, and love, open the cover and let it welcome you into its heart. And The Trouble with Goats and Sheep by Joanna Cannon – ‘A charming tale of ordinary folk sweltering in the heat. I loved it.’ our very own Sarah Broadhurst. 

yaflcfdlc
lccmtaacmt

Winter Winners! – January Books of the Month

A wonderful way to start the New Year. If you weren’t inundated with novels for Christmas, then have a look at three of our favourites this month.

The Veil by Joseph D’Lacey – A provocative, gut-wrenching and oh so readable pair of tales focusing on apocalyptic events. The Bone Field by Simon Kernick An action-packed and mind-gripping start to a new series that promises to deliver in spades. Dodgers by Bill Beverly A book that will come to be seen as a landmark in US crime writing. ~ Maxim Jakubowski.

Happy New YOU!

It’s the perfect time to make a fresh start and our New Year, New You section is teeming with temptation-free titles to tighten waistlines, train brains and teach old dogs new tricks. Whatever your personal ambitions in 2017, clicking here is a good place to start your quest to find the new you.

hl

Famous Five – Costa Category Winners

Uniquely split into five categories, the Costa Book Awards is one of the biggest literary prizes out there, honouring superlative writing by novelists, biographers, debutants, poets and children’s authors. A perfect start to the year, we think, celebrating the winners of each hotly contested category. The overall winner will be announced at the end of January. Find out more.

Newer than New! – Pre-Publication Exclusives

Three reasons to find out more about our ‘Coming Soon‘ category…

#1 – This is our ‘Try before you buy’ service for discerning, word-thirsty book fans.

#2 – Get ahead of the game and try our exclusive extracts of great books before they hit the shelves.

#3 – Don’t trust the reviews? Decide for yourself whether a book is up your street before it’s even published.

See the shelves below for some January highlights.

rtcmtlcaa
cmtcmtlcghf

Scroll down to see more hand-picked selections in the categories you have asked us to keep you up to date with. To change them just log in to your account.

P.S. Science fans will know that Stephen Hawking is 75 this month and although he’d say it’s a very brief history in the vastness of Time, we think it’s worth celebrating by sharing details of a revised and up to the minute edition of the Hawking biography.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
Share

Top 10 most popular books 1 – 8 January 2017

Lovereading Top 10

1
Lyrebird Lyrebird
Cecelia Ahern
One of our Books of the Year 2016.
Just so, so gorgeous! Laura lives on her own in the woodland wilds of South West Ireland, a film crew discover she has a special gift, will she be exploited or set free? …
Download free opening extract
2
When I Was Invisible When I Was Invisible
Dorothy Koomson
One of our Books of the Year 2016.
May 2016 MEGA Book of the Month.
An absolute page-turner of a novel, at times uncomfortable, yet powerful and oh so compelling. Roni and Nika meet when they are 8 years old, as the …
Download free opening extract
3
Behind Her Eyes Behind Her Eyes
Sarah Pinborough
Oh my word, this book is devious, twisted, and an absolute knockout! The story, revolving around love, passion, suspicion, and deceit kept me teetering on a razor sharp wire of uncertainty. Sarah Pinborough’s writing is sublime, it’s shrewd, artful, cunning, …
Download free opening extract
4
The Beautiful Dead The Beautiful Dead
Belinda Bauer
One of our Books of the Year 2016.
December 2016 Book of the Month.
Oh my, this is a clever, chilling, and penetrating read. 29 year old TV crime reporter Eve Singer looks for murder and mayhem, but she needs to watch …
Download free opening extract
5
The Spy The Spy
Paulo Coelho
One of our Books of the Year 2016.
December 2016 MEGA Book of the Month.
A short, emotional and entirely captivating novel based on the real events that surrounded, enclosed and smothered the notorious Mata Hari. Mata Hari is a name that …
Download free opening extract
6
I'm Travelling Alone I’m Travelling Alone
Samuel Bjork
A Maxim Jakubowski selected title.
Already a bestseller in over 30 countries, this stunning Norwegian debut finally appears in English. Such was its impact elsewhere that it will now be the subject of a forthcoming ITV series. When a young girl …
Download free opening extract
7
Where My Heart Used to Beat Where My Heart Used to Beat
Sebastian Faulks
The recurring themes of Sebastian Faulks’s fiction are here brought together with a new stylistic brilliance as the novel casts a long, baleful light over the century we have left behind but may never fully understand. Daring, ambitious and in …
Download free opening extract
8
The Crow Girl The Crow Girl
Erik Axl Sund
If you thought The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo was the epitome of Nordic noir’s savage darkness, think again. Graphic, violent and weaving a thread of evil with the dexterity of a malevolent spider, this Swedish trilogy by a collaborative …
Download free opening extract
9
The Gustav Sonata The Gustav Sonata
Rose Tremain
Shortlisted for the Costa Novel Award 2016.
Fierce, astringent, profoundly tender, Rose Tremain’s beautifully orchestrated novel asks the question, what does it do to a person, or to a country, to pursue an eternal quest for neutrality, and self-mastery, while all …
Download free opening extract
10
The Hanging Club The Hanging Club
Tony Parsons
One of our Books of the Year 2016.
June 2016 Book of the Month.
The third in the London based detective series featuring a man I really like, one Max Wolf, second in command in the Saville Row Crime Squad. His very …
Download free opening extract
Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
Share