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Most popular books on Lovereading 22 – 29 March 2015

Lovereading Top 10

1
The Silence of the Sea The Silence of the Sea
Yrsa Sigurdardottir
March 2015 Book of the Month.
In Iceland grandparents and a young child go to the port to meet a yacht with the girl’s family on board (parents and twin sister). The yacht smashes into the quay empty. So begins this …
Download free opening extract
2
What She Left What She Left
T. R. Richmond
An intriguing and successful experiment in presenting a crime thriller from a different angle, Richmond’s accomplished debut encourages the reader to become the sleuth. Alice Salmon dies in what initially appears a tragic case of drowning. An academic tries to …
Download free opening extract
3
The Pocket Wife The Pocket Wife
Susan Crawford
March 2015 Debut of the Month.
The Pocket Wife is a domestic psychological thriller that makes the reader question everything, and it will stay with you – as all good thrillers do – long after you have finished it.  Dana wakes …
Download free opening extract
4
That Girl from Nowhere That Girl from Nowhere
Dorothy Koomson
What a terrific and powerful book, I reckon it is her best yet.  It covers race, adoption, rejection and even murder (or does it?).  Our hero, Smithy, a black girl, white adopted parents, white long-term boyfriend, discovers her biological family …
Download free opening extract
5
A Perfect Heritage A Perfect Heritage
Penny Vincenzi
March 2015 Book of the Month.
An author renowned for big books has surpassed herself and written a huge, 939 page, tome. It is long, it is big, it is brilliant, perhaps her best yet. It centres on a cosmetic company …
Download free opening extract
6
Hidden Hidden
Emma Kavanagh
Full of suspense with any number of red herrings, this is cracking stuff by a former police psychologist.  Narrated from four points of view, it concerns a major shooting incident in a Welsh hospital.  Not only does it jump viewpoints, …
Download free opening extract
7
The Girl on the Train The Girl on the Train
Paula Hawkins
A Maxim Jakubowski selected title.
In the footsteps of Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl and S.J. Watson’s Before I Go to Sleep, the unreliable narrator domestic drama of untruths is the new ‘hot’ genre. The author was best known under another name …
Download free opening extract
8
America Unchained America Unchained
Dave Gorman
Dave Gorman gives us another brilliant book in the challenge he gives himself of driving across America without using any of the mult-inational chains, which sounds wonderful and nightmarish at the same time. It is!! His natural charm and dry …
Download free opening extract
9
Gallipoli Gallipoli
Alan Moorehead, Sir Max Hastings
The Centenary anniversary of Gallipoli, the First World War campaign that was doomed to failure, bringing about the tragic loss of so many men. First published in 1956, Alan Moorehead’s history of Gallipoli still remains as the definitive study. Now …
Download free opening extract
10
Young Skins Young Skins
Colin Barrett
Winner of the 2014 Guardian First Book Award.
Winner of the 2014 Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award.
This magnificent collection takes us to Glanbeigh, a small town in rural Ireland – a town in which the youth have the run of …
Download free opening extract

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15 books with more characters than you can keep track of

At Lovereading we love epic books with swathes of characters creating a wonderfully complex plot … but sometimes is it all too much? Below are 15 books with increasing casts of characters. Scroll down to discover how many named characters there are in novels like Shogun James Clavell, Bleak House Charles Dickens, A Suitable Boy Vikram Seth, The Stand Stephen King and of course Game of Thrones George R.R. Martin.

books with most characters

books with most characters

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Authors who have written under a pseudonym

At Lovereading we always like a literary mystery so we thought we would look into famous authors who have written under a pseudonym and why.

Below are our top 20 from Robert Galbraith (a.k.a. J.K. Rowling) through Paul French (a.k.a. Isaac Asimov) to Eric Blair (a.k.a George Orwell). We hope you enjoy the discoveries.

Famous authors who have written under a pseudonym and why

Famous authors who have written under a pseudonym and why

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Trek Crete and meet Victoria Hislop in Spinalonga

trek-crete

Lepra’s Trek Crete offers a unique opportunity to meet Victoria Hislop, take on a challenge whilst making new friends and to raise money to help improve the lives of people living with disease, poverty and prejudice. 

Participants will get an insight into Crete’s diverse landscapes whilst challenging themselves to trek one of the longest gorges in Europe, reaching the summit of the highest peak in Crete: Psiloritis (also known as Mount Ida) at 2,456m.  The scenery is spectacular, trekking past rugged cliffs from where you will enjoy some of the best views in the world.

Another highlight of the trip will be a visit to Spinalonga, home of a former leprosy colony, where participants will have a guided tour and learn more about the history of the island.  We are delighted to have the support of novelist Victoria Hislop. Participants will have the pleasure of meeting her in person at a local café and hear how the special island Spinalonga inspired her to write her famous book `The Island.’

Places are limited and we are looking to fill the last places by the end of April.  Please find attached the exciting itinerary.  The costs are a £290 registration fee and a minimum sponsorship target of £1,700.  The sponsorship amount includes all trip costs.

This amazing trip is a fantastic opportunity for anyone who loves walking and enjoys the great outdoors. The fitter participants are prior to departure, the easier the challenge will be.  So why not get your walking boots on for Lepra and enjoy the great outdoors over the spring and summer?

Places are limited so if you are interested in signing up please get in touch. Email Lizzie at events@lepra.org.uk  or call 01206 216700.  For more information please visit www.lepra.org.uk/Event/trek-crete-2015   Thank you.

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Lovereading’s Top 10 books 15 – 22 March 2015

Lovereading Top 10

1
The Silence of the Sea The Silence of the Sea
Yrsa Sigurdardottir
March 2015 Book of the Month.
In Iceland grandparents and a young child go to the port to meet a yacht with the girl’s family on board (parents and twin sister). The yacht smashes into the quay empty. So begins this …
Download free opening extract
2
The Pocket Wife The Pocket Wife
Susan Crawford
March 2015 Debut of the Month.
The Pocket Wife is a domestic psychological thriller that makes the reader question everything, and it will stay with you – as all good thrillers do – long after you have finished it.  Dana wakes …
Download free opening extract
3
What She Left What She Left
T. R. Richmond
This is likely to be one of 2015′s most haunting and unforgettable debuts.  Accident, murder or suicide?  The whole mystery of Alice Salmon’s death is revealed in a series of letters from Professor Jeremy Cooke to an old friend which …
Download free opening extract
4
That Girl from Nowhere That Girl from Nowhere
Dorothy Koomson
What a terrific and powerful book, I reckon it is her best yet.  It covers race, adoption, rejection and even murder (or does it?).  Our hero, Smithy, a black girl, white adopted parents, white long-term boyfriend, discovers her biological family …
Download free opening extract
5
The Jackdaw The Jackdaw
Luke Delaney
March 2015 eBook of the Month.
A dark, psychological, crime procedural tale in which city people are kidnapped, murdered (one on line with a public vote) or hideously disfigured (eyes gouged out, fingers cut off, flesh scored) while DI Sean Corrigan …
Download free opening extract
6
The Darkest Hour The Darkest Hour
Barbara Erskine
March 2015 Book of the Month.
What can I say about this fabulous book? That it is classic Erskine time-slip drama of passion and incident; that it covers the war years and today and that it is big and glorious in …
Download free opening extract
7
The Sandman The Sandman
Lars Kepler
This is a powerhouse of a read, it will tempt and cajole you into reading faster and faster, the last page will whisper seductively to you but hold on firmly to your horses and enjoy the wild ride. The husband …
Download free opening extract
8
The Last Word The Last Word
Hanif Kureishi
March 2015 Book of the Month.
As one would expect from such a talented writer, this is an intelligent, amusing and intimate novel.  Sometimes when you look forward to something too much, you can be disappointed; therefore start with an open …
Download free opening extract
9
The Art of Waiting The Art of Waiting
Christopher Jory
A captivating and very human tale that transports you to the heart of what really matters. Although set before, during and after the Second World War, this is by no means a novel just about war, it is rather, an …
Download free opening extract
10
A Place Called Winter A Place Called Winter
Patrick Gale
A slight departure for this highly regarded author being an historical tale of Edwardian London and Canada based on a true story from his family history. Harry Case, a gentleman in suburban London, marries and has a daughter. Unexpectedly he …
Download free opening extract

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Ask the Author: Jane Johnson, The Tenth Gift

By Vikki Patis

As part of the Cornish Reading Challenge, I spoke to Jane Johnson, author and Fiction Publishing Director for HarperCollins.

jane-johnson-author-portraitJane Johnson has worked in the book industry for over 20 years, as a bookseller, publisher and writer, and is the author of The Tenth GiftThe Salt Road and The Sultan’s Wife. She was responsible for publishing the works of J. R. R. Tolkien during the 1980s and 1990s and worked on Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings movie trilogy, spending many months in New Zealand with cast and crew. Under the pseudonym of Jude Fisher she has written the bestselling Visual Companions to the films of Lord of the Rings andThe Hobbit. She has also written several books for children, including The Secret CountryMaskmaker and Goldseekers.

Jane married her own ‘Berber pirate’, and now they split their time between Cornwall and a village in the Anti-Atlas Mountains. She still works, remotely, as Fiction Publishing Director for HarperCollins.

Her first historical novel, The Tenth Gift, which is set around Gulval and Penzance, was inspired by a story her mother told her when she was a child, about an ancestor who had been stolen by ‘pirates’.

She didn’t know who these pirates were, but in 2004 I researched our family tree and found that young Catherine Tregenna’s birth records were in the parish register, but there were no marriage or death records for her. And then I learned there had been a raid in Mount’s Bay by pirates from the North African coast in 1625: they captured 60 men, women and children from the church in Penzance and sold them into slavery in Morocco. Catherine would have been 19 at the time: it was the perfect starting point for a novel.

9780141033419Johnson lives in Mousehole, a place she has loved since she was a child, but she was raised on Fowey.

My father was a fisherman and a lifeboatman there: I have always loved Cornish fishing villages, and because the roots of my mother’s family lie in West Penwith, it was the place I felt drawn to when I returned to Cornwall after working out of the county for 20 years.

She is currently working on a new book, Court of Lions.

It starts with two children, fast friends, growing up in the most beautiful place in the civilised world – the Alhambra Palace – in 15th century Spain. It. One is a beggar-child, the other will become the last Moorish king of Granada. They have no idea of the vast events that will overwhelm them as they grow to adulthood, as Isabella and Ferdinand sweep to power and bring the Spanish Inquisition into being to remove every non-Catholic from Spain. It’s a dramatic, epic period, but I want to concentrate on the poignant relationship between the beggar and the Moorish king. It’s a love story, a war story and a tale about the need for tolerance, in our time as much as theirs.

Her advice to aspiring writers is simple: it’s all about putting the hours in.

Innate talent is a myth: what makes the difference is learning your craft and – as with any other skill worth pursuing – working very hard to improve it. That means reading books that inspire you, books you aspire to being able to write but can’t imagine you’ll ever have the skill to achieve: only by setting your sites high and trying to reach them will you become a better writer. Learn about structure on a large and small scale; learn to take your writing apart and put it back together, better. Listen to the way people really speak and learn how to render that in dialogue. Keep your language simple and be ruthless in your editing. And persevere: it’s a tough, tough job!

Although Johnson is trying to keep her diary clear this year to focus on her writing, she is appearing at a few events.

I’m running a Guardian Masterclass in April about the writing of epic fiction, and I’ve been asked to speak at the Romantic Novelists Association convention in July… It’s hard to find time to write when you’re holding down a full-time job.

Johnson recommends several novels:

Oh, there are so many! Anything by Mary Renault – superb historical fiction Hilary Mantel’s WOLF HALL and BRING UP THE BODIES Anything by Robin Hobb: sweeping epic stories with a touch of magic LONESOME DOVE by Larry McMurtry: the greatest western ever written The poems of Rumi Robert Macfarlane’s sublime nature writing WILD by Cheryl Strayed: her trek along the Pacific Coast Trail reminds me of my own epic drama while climbing in the Moroccan mountains.

She’s currently re-reading A Dance With Dragons by George RR Martin, in preparation for the fifth season of Game of Thrones in April.

He’s one of the authors I publish and it’s been 4 years since I edited the book.

This or That

  1. Seaside or countryside? SEASIDE
  2. Ice cream or pasty? PASTY
  3. Sunshine or rain? SUNSHINE
  4. E-book or paperback? PAPERBACK
  5. Tea or coffee? COFFEE

Johnson’s The Tenth Gift is available on Lovereading, the UK’s No 1 book recommendation site. If you’ve chosen her novel for the Cornish Reading Challenge, get in touch! I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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Mid March email update

Snow, rain or sunshine, whatever the weather our March book selections will not disappoint. Read on for news of amazing April titles you can start reading now, the latest Literary Festival news and don’t forget to enter our free prize draw to win a luxury weekend in Salisbury

     

Pre-Publication for the Nation! – Pre-pub exclusives

The only thing better than getting your hands on a book as soon as it’s published is sneaking a peek before! See some of our favourites below and look out for the ones with Reader Reviews for an extra view.

A Place Called Winter by Patrick GaleTender and epic: an intimate, brutal and breathtaking human drama. The Day We Disappeared by Lucy RobinsonSecrets. You can’t run from them, you know!… Chic-lit with bite. What She Left by T R RichmondA modern and utterly immersive psychological thriller. That Girl From Nowhere by Dorothy KoomsonEmotional thriller about love, identity and the real meaning of family.

The Book of Life by Deborah HarknessIntoxicating and imaginative mix of science history, magic and fantasy. The Museum of Things Left Behind by Seni GlaisterHeartwarming fable about modern life and the importance of a good cup of tea. The Good Girl by Fiona NeillA dark, compelling and controversial novel of family secrets. From the author of Slummy Mummy. The Art of Waiting by Christopher JoryUtterly compelling and very human … transports you to the heart of what really matters.

Even more Pre-Publication extracts to read …

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Chilling, thrilling and 100% fulfilling




Any fan of Stieg Larsson who hasn’t read books by Icelandic Yrsa Sigurdardottir is missing a huge thrill.

Her latest The Silence of the Sea is just out and our Reader Review Panel gave it top marks … ‘An absolute must read – a creepy, atmospheric mystery’ – Lisa Lamb … ‘A truly gripping, scary thriller’ – Sarah Musk … ‘A fab read, intelligently written and well paced. A cracker.‘ – Gavin DimmockFind out what you are missing today.

     

Don’t forget – Win a LUXURY Weekend in Salisbury




Steeped in history and surrounded by beautiful countryside, Salisbury is one of the UK’s most picturesque spots. You could be slipping off for a sumptuous weekend sojourn for 2 worth over £300. Just the ticket as spring hangs the bows with blossom. And in a year commemorating 800 years since Magna Carta. Click here for more.

Catch up with the Festival News

And while we are on the subject of getting out and about with books … This month’s Literary Festival highlights offer you big names in small places at the Chipping Norton Literary Festival (23-26 April), a literary lock-in on the Hebridean isle of Colonsay (25-26 April) and an eclectic mix of authors including 4 dames in the bard’s historic home town of Stratford-upon-Avon (25 April-3 May).

Click and Scroll through your next great read




Pretty much all our selections are available as eBooks nowadays yet uniquely Lovereading lets you choose the format, ePub, iBook or Nook that suits you best.

This month a favourite is one for fans of Mark Billingham. By Luke Delaney, it’s called The Jackdaw and is part of his DI Sean Corrigan series. It’s a dark, psychological, crime novel that one of our Reader Reviewers, Angie Rhodes, said was the most exciting thriller she had read for a long time…

     

Words and Pictures – from Page to Screen








Look out for the dazzling adaptation of Susanna Clarke’s incredible, inventive, gripping Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell as it hits our TV screens in a hugely anticipated 7 part BBC series later this year. Join the in-fighting among a group of 19th Century magicians (yes, magicians) as they face Napoleon’s advancing army. Weird, wonderful and well worth a read!

And take a gentle yet fascinating stroll back into another era, into the memories of Gertrude Bell, a woman so far ahead of her time she would still be considered remarkable today! Her book Tales from the Queen of the Desert has been turned into a film staring Nicole Kidman.

     

BAILEYS Women’s Prize for Fiction … longlist

Such a strong longlist this year we thought we would share a few of our favourites.


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That’s March at Lovereading. See you next month with more great ideas, hints and a helpful hand to find the next book you’ll love reading.

Happy Love … reading




P.S. GoT fans take note … We have a copy of season 4 DVD box set, a ‘classic editions’ book box set (RRP £65!!) and a season 5 tie-in book to give away to ONE lucky reader. Enter before Winter arrives on 5 April.

 

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Lovereading Book Review: Dear Millie Diary of a Seven Year Old with Cancer by Marco Previero

Dear Millie is the true and remarkable story of Millie Previero, a seven-year-old girl who was diagnosed with cancer in the shape of a rare and malignant brain tumour. 

Written by her father, Marco, it’s a heart-wrenching descent into every parent’s worst nightmare and their desperate fight to save their daughter.
9781784622022Gripping, and beautifully written, it begins on 5 April 2013, when Millie wakes up complaining of fuzziness in her ‘beautiful brown eyes’, which soon turns into a loss of vision in her right eye and near-blindness in her left.


A quick diagnosis sees her checked into Great Ormond Street Hospital, where she undergoes a terrifying eight-hour craniotomy, or brain operation. This, however, is just the start of a terrifying ordeal; the book follows Millie as she undergoes further gruelling treatment, including two further brain operations, aggressive chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which ultimately takes the family 4,000 miles from home.

Swiftly realising there will be no ‘easy choices,’ Marco and his wife Vanessa face many harrowing decisions – the most heart-breaking being whether to give Millie treatment which may permanently damage her.

Marco laments at one stage, “The Millie we have known for seven years is dead… a new one may come back but how close to the original?”

It is hard not to be moved when Marco describes how Millie brightens at the sound of her mother’s voice after an intense operation, or asks to be carried down to the operating theatre by her father.
Profound, gritty and at times even funny, this book – penned primarily as an account for Millie to read later, should she survive – touches on the rollercoaster of life: sacrifice, hardship, hope and love.

Most importantly, it is a tale of survival and about how terrible things in life can make us stronger.

Marco captures this sentiment perfectly. “While I would not wish it on anyone, Millie’s cancer was, in a sense, a gift,” he says. “It revealed a side to human nature we seldom encounter…. On those rare occasions when we are forced to interact… with people we don’t know, we are often surprised by the kindness and generosity.”

Unequivocally raw and honest, Dear Millie is a wonderful account of how you can fall into a bleak abyss, survive and – ultimately – be uplifted and renewed by the experience,

Dear Millie is proud to support Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity. Dear Millie: Diary of a Seven Year Old With Cancer by Marco Previero (ISBN: 9781784622022) is published by Matador on 28 March 2015.

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Top 10 books on Lovereading 8 – 15 March 2015

Lovereading Top 10

1
The Buried Giant The Buried Giant
Kazuo Ishiguro
March 2015 Book of the Month.
Ishiguro’s first novel in a decade is like nothing he’s ever written before though many of the themes he likes to explore – memory, connections, how past, present and future interweave, are there. Axl and …
Download free opening extract
2
The Girl in the Red Coat The Girl in the Red Coat
Kate Hamer
March 2015 Debut of the Month.
A stunningly original debut that weaves a multitude of emotions throughout. Single parent Beth has a hard time keeping her daughter Carmel from randomly wandering off.  Then, when Carmel is eight she really does get …
Download free opening extract
3
The Silence of the Sea The Silence of the Sea
Yrsa Sigurdardottir
March 2015 Book of the Month.
In Iceland grandparents and a young child go to the port to meet a yacht with the girl’s family on board (parents and twin sister). The yacht smashes into the quay empty. So begins this …
Download free opening extract
4
The Pocket Wife The Pocket Wife
Susan Crawford
March 2015 Debut of the Month.
The Pocket Wife is a domestic psychological thriller that makes the reader question everything, and it will stay with you – as all good thrillers do – long after you have finished it.  Dana wakes …
Download free opening extract
5
The Darkest Hour The Darkest Hour
Barbara Erskine
March 2015 Book of the Month.
What can I say about this fabulous book? That it is classic Erskine time-slip drama of passion and incident; that it covers the war years and today and that it is big and glorious in …
Download free opening extract
6
The Mirror World of Melody Black The Mirror World of Melody Black
Gavin Extence
March 2015 Book of the Month.
A surprisingly intimate and compelling read, and one that exposes an emotionally challenging and often hidden world. The diverting way in which the author introduces Abby, suggests that something is essentially different, but at …
Download free opening extract
7
A Perfect Heritage A Perfect Heritage
Penny Vincenzi
March 2015 Book of the Month.
An author renowned for big books has surpassed herself and written a huge, 939 page, tome. It is long, it is big, it is brilliant, perhaps her best yet. It centres on a cosmetic company …
Download free opening extract
8
The Raven's Head The Raven’s Head
Karen Maitland
March 2015 Book of the Month.
The quest for eternal life; a tale of alchemy and skulduggery in the thirteenth century.  Starting in France our young hero, Philippe, in the employment of a count in the court of Louis VIII discovers …
Download free opening extract
9
Remember Me This Way Remember Me This Way
Sabine Durrant
A tale full of passion, anger, fear and heartache, an excellent read which concerns the love between a lonely school librarian, Lizzie, and a compulsive/obsessive artist, Zach. It is fast-paced, told from two points of view. That in itself is …
Download free opening extract
10
Wish You Were Here Wish You Were Here
Catherine Alliott
March 2015 Book of the Month.
James, a foot surgeon, saves a child from a peanut allergy and the girl’s grateful mother, a famous opera singer, lends him her chateau in France for a month. Out go James, his wife Flora, …
Download free opening extract

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Mark Zuckerberg’s A Year of Books Reading Challenge

January 2015 Mark Zuckerberg CEO of Facebook posted the message below….

‘My challenge for 2015 is to read a new book every other week — with an emphasis on learning about different cultures, beliefs, histories and technologies.

I’m excited for my reading challenge. I’ve found reading books very intellectually fulfilling. Books allow you to fully explore a topic and immerse yourself in a deeper way than most media today. I’m looking forward to shifting more of my media diet towards reading books.’ He has called this A Year of Books.

A year in books

To make it easy to follow Mark Zuckerberg’s selections we will be featuring them all on this blog post – and in time on a special category on the website.

__________________________________________________________

Book 1 January: The End of Power by Moises Naim

The End of Power From Boardrooms to Battlefields and Churches to States, Why Being in Charge isn’t What it Used to be argues that in every field of endeavor – business, religion, politics, and all matters of war and peace – power is no longer what it used to be.

The author deftly delineates the shifting global dynamics in control, authority and expertise between the traditionally dominant megaplayers and the newly ascendant micropowers.

Book 2 January: The Better Angels of Our Nature A History of Violence and Humanity by Steven Pinker

This title was shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize 2012 and argues that, contrary to popular belief, humankind has become progressively less violent, over millenia and decades. Can violence really have declined?

The images of conflict we see daily on our screens from around the world suggest this is an almost obscene claim to be making. Extraordinarily, however, Steven Pinker shows violence within and between societies – both murder and warfare – really has declined from prehistory to today.

Book 3 February: Gang Leader for a Day by Sudhir Venkatesh

Sudhir Venkatesh the young sociologist who became famous in Freakonomics (Why do drug dealers still live with their moms?) describes his time living with the gangs on the Southside of Chicago and answers another question: what’s it like to live in hell? In the Robert Taylor Homes projects on Chicago’s South Side, Sudhir befriends J.T., a gang leader for the Black Kings. As he slowly gains J.T.’s trust, one day, in order to convince Sudhir of his own CEO-like qualities, J.T. makes him leader of the gang…Why does J.T. make his henchmen, the ‘shorties’, stay in school? What is the difference between a ‘regular’ hustler and a ‘hype’ – and is Peanut telling him the truth about which she is? And, when the FBI finally starts cracking down on the Black Kings, is it time to get out – or is it too late?

Book 4 February: On Immunity: An Inoculation by Eula Biss

In this bold, fascinating book, Eula Biss addresses a chronic condition of fear – fear of the government, the medical establishment, and what may be in your children’s air, food, mattresses, medicines, and vaccines. Reflecting on her own experience as a new mother, Biss investigates the metaphors and myths surrounding our conception of immunity and its implications for the individual and the social body. She extends a conversation with other mothers to meditations on Voltaire’s Candide, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, Susan Sontag’s AIDS and Its Metaphors, and beyond. On Immunity is an inoculation against our fear and a moving account of how we are all interconnected – our bodies and our fates.

Book 5 March: Creativity, Inc. Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration by Ed Catmull

As9780593070109-300x400 a young man, Ed Catmull had a dream: to make the world’s first computer-animated movie. He nurtured that dream first as a Ph.D. student at the University of Utah, where many computer science pioneers got their start, and then forged an early partnership with George Lucas that led, indirectly, to his founding Pixar with Steve Jobs and John Lasseter in 1986. Nine years later and against all odds, Toy Story was released, changing animation forever. Since then, Pixar has dominated the world of animation, producing such beloved films as Monsters, Inc., Finding Nemo, The Incredibles, Up, and WALL-E, which have gone on to set box-office records and garner twenty-seven Academy Awards. The joyousness of the storytelling, the inventive plots, the emotional authenticity: In some ways, Pixar movies are an object lesson in what creativity really is. Now, in this book, Catmull reveals the ideals and techniques, honed over years, that have made Pixar so widely admired – and so profitable. Creativity, Inc. is a book for managers who want to lead their employees to new heights, a manual for anyone who strives for originality, and the first-ever, all-access trip into the nerve center of Pixar Animation Studios – into the story meetings, the postmortems, and the ‘Braintrust’ sessions where art is born. It is, at heart, a book about how to build and sustain a creative culture-but it is also, as Pixar co-founder and president Ed Catmull writes, ‘an expression of the ideas that I believe make the best in us possible.’

Book 6 March: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S. Kuhn

9780226458120A good book may have the power to change the way we see the world, but a great book actually becomes part of our daily consciousness, pervading our thinking to the point that we take it for granted, and we forget how provocative and challenging its ideas once were-and still are. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions is that kind of book. When it was first published in 1962, it was a landmark event in the history and philosophy of science. And fifty years later, it still has many lessons to teach. With The Structure of Scientific Revolutions , Kuhn challenged long-standing linear notions of scientific progress, arguing that transformative ideas don’t arise from the day-to-day, gradual process of experimentation and data accumulation, but that revolutions in science, those breakthrough moments that disrupt accepted thinking and offer unanticipated ideas, occur outside of normal science, as he called it. Though Kuhn was writing when physics ruled the sciences, his ideas on how scientific revolutions bring order to the anomalies that amass over time in research experiments are still instructive in our biotech age.  Newly designed, with an expanded index, this edition will be eagerly welcomed by the next generation of readers seeking to understand the history of our perspectives on science.

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